About The Breed

History


By the early 1900's the French Bulldog was ranked as the fifth most popular dog in the United States. (Dearth) The French Bulldog was a much desired pet in fashionable circles, both in France and in the United States, in the early 20th Century. The French Bulldog has a long and complicated history. According to Kim Dearth, the family tree of the French Bulldog, as its name implies, branches from that of its cousin the Bulldog, also known as the English Bulldog. (Dearth) Interestingly, some of these mini Bulldogs also came to France with workers of a much different vocation; French sailors fancied these strong, sturdy and easily smuggled little dogs and brought them back from trips across the English Channel. (Dearth) Lace-makers also took interest in these dogs and took them to France. French Bulldogs have many characteristics that distinguish them from other types of dogs.


Characteristics


The French Bulldog stands about 12 in. (30.4 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 19 to 28 lb (8.6-12.7 kg). According to Kim Thornton, the Frenchie has a distinctive appearance, characterized by a large, square head that's flat between the ears with a slightly rounded forehead, a muscular body with heavy bone and smooth coat. (Thornton) French Bulldogs require some substantial maintenance. Kim Thornton explains, frenchies are easy to groom. (Thornton) Like all breeds, the French Bulldog should have its nails clipped and its teeth brushed regularly; however, its ears may require a little more attention. (Dearth) As you can see, the French Bulldog is an interesting type of dog. This breed may look like a bruiser, but underneath its brawny exterior is a loveable lap dog and constant companion. (Dearth)


Care


French Bulldogs require some substantial maintenance. Kim Thornton explains, frenchies are easy to groom. A weekly brushing with a mitt or soft brush and a bath monthly or as needed keeps the coat in excellent condition. They don't shed heavily. Like any breed, French Bulldogs have some not-so-attractive qualities. They can be stubborn when it comes to house training. They don't do well with a rough, heavy style of training at all, Vitcah says. (Thornton) Like all breeds, the French Bulldog should have its nails clipped and its teeth brushed regularly; however, its ears may require a little more attention. Although the ear airs out well due to its upright carriage, it also tends to catch dust and dirt. Clean the ears once a week with a canine ear cleaner. The eyes and nose folds also need some extra care. Wipe around the eyes and in the face wrinkles with a moist cotton ball at least once a week. (Dearth)


Works Cited


Dearth, Kim. Flair and Fanfare the French Bulldog. Dog World Dec. 2000: 14. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. French Bulldog. Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia. 6th ed. Columbia UP, 2009. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. Secord, William. The French Bulldog in Art. Dog World Jan. 2008: 26-26. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. Thornton, Kim Campbell. French Bulldog (Cover story). Dog World Jan. 2008: 22-27. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Oct. 2009.


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